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Search Results 0 to 38 of about 39 (some duplicates have been removed)
fellow republicans to vote to endorse the united nations treaty on disabilities. this treaty, united nation's treaty. it does nothing -- doesn't change any existing law, doesn't give it any authority at all in the united states. it doesn't make any new laws in the united states. all the treaty says get this it encourages other nations to give staled people the same rights that they enjoy in the united states. they enjoy in the united states under the americans with disabilities acts with 1990, which bob dole championed and george h.w. bush signed into law. it's a great law that has helped millions of americans: 154 countries, other nations have endorsed this and saying disabled people should have same rights other americans enjoy like they do in the united states of america. it needed add two-thirds vote. john kerry was the champion who carried it on the floor in the house, in the senate and said come on. here is bob dole. he is here for a reason. >> that's why an 89-year-old veteran one week removed from bethesda naval hospital comes back to the sen
with respect to united nations convention on this they are fairly outrageous. and what they're looking for, at the end of the day is respect, respect out the table and respect for who they are and what they are doing. and semi-we can define the means to bring these two solitudes together because at the end of the day any conflicts, whether it's kinetic or otherwise, that adversely affects the sultry to that part of the world will have a fundamentally adverse impact on the global economy spent it's doing it now with china and japan. that's interesting, as you've got two of the biggest economies in the world in a nightmare situation that raises a fundamental question, and it's of ending this myth that economics draws people closer together. part of the title today is "mischief or miscalculation?." during the cold war, what was interesting is you can have 17 different spheres of contact with the soviets and if two and if to implement you it's about 15 others. there was a lot of heavy investment figuring out how to communicate and how to coordinate, how to deal with escalation, how do you talk
bob dole took to the senate floor in his wheelchair to push for support of the united nations treaty that helps disabled people around the world. despite that, senators voted against the treaty, something that would presumably have had a wide margin of support. >> i've heard from advocacy group s consisting of people w hope that this treaty will protect disabled americans who will protect them as they travel abroad. i've also heard from parents of disabled children that this treaty will threaten their rights as parents. >> i sympathize with john boehner. the tea party has a firm grip on the republican party and that's obvious, what's happened this morning here in washington. >> in rejecting this treaty, the united states broke from 125 countries that have ratified the treaty, including syria and saudi arabia. senate republicans actually voted to approve the measure, like senator john mccain and kelly ayotte, to name a few. others b others band together saying that if passed it will inhibit people in the united states. ana navaro and maria cardona joins us. in john mccain's words pro
's health in numbers. unitedhealthcare. >>> the democratic republic of congo is a nation the size of western europe. it may be in for violent regime change, rebels called m 23 have gained ground in recent weeks. congo was the setting for joseph conrad's "heart of darkness." that darkness hasn't lifted in 110 years since the story was published. in the last 14 years alone, 5.4 million died in congo as a result of conflict and humanitarian crisis. jeff, why is it that the crisis seems to be heating up? you point out that the congo that the government's army is losing battle after battle. being routed in battle after battle by the rebels. >> i think this is really an issue of state failure. i've been covering congo for six years and i've seen the country get weaker and weaker since i began. there was a big election in 2006 that created a lot of hope and enthusiasm that things were turning around. they haven't. since then, the government has become more authoritarian, more corrupt, more rebel groups. what we are seeing is a symptom and cause. it's a symptom of this weak state that can't control
at the united nations first to james rosen at the state department and to james nato is taking steps to minimize the amount landing outside of syria. >> that's right, shep. the foreign ministers of the military alliance gathered in brussels today and announced there that they have approved a request made by member state turkey which asked for u.s.-made patriot antimissile batteries to be installed along its southern border syria. the ministry made clear the systems are purely defensive. germany and netherlands are supplying the pac three model as soon as their respective parliaments approve the deal which is expected to come soon. >> when that exactly will happen will depend on a number of practical issues that will be sorted out in the very near future. so i can't give you an exact date but i will tell you that the actual deployment of missiles will take place within weeks. >> hundreds of nato troops will also be deployed to install and operate these antimissile weapons but it doesn't appear right now that they will be u.s. troops, shep. >> shepard: sheriffs clinton was at that meeting in bruss
and whatever they can on line. the united nations is warning of a impending humanitarian crisis. 40,000 people died since the fighting began 20 months ago . the number has doubled in the last few months. conor powell has more. >> after three days, the internet is back on in damascus but much of syria is without a internet connection. the syrian government place blamed the terrorist for the outage but others say it was shut down by the assad regime. in recent days rebels are in.ing closer to damas cus . the best bet is that the syrian government was shutting off the communications equipment. heaviest fighting is around the damascus international airport. both emerit and egyptian air cancelled flights out because of the fighting. the government said the airport is back open . the rebels say they control the main road leading to the airport and there are reports of heavy fighting. it was firmly in the control of assad but it may be weakening. there is a growing humanitarian crisis. in addition to the 40,000 people killed the un said 700,000 syrians are displaced and the number could go higher wit
united nations to take control of the internet? jon: just in. new information out of egypt. reuters is reporting that egyptian president mohammed morsi has left the presidential palace after protesters fight with riot police outside the palace. of course he has been under intense pressure from his own people ever since he assumed autocratic powers and he has been engaged in a fight with the court system there. people have been very angry about what he has done. at any rate according to reuters he has left the presidential palace because of this, well, call them, demonstration, call them a mob. i'm not sure how you want to describe it but those are pictures outside the presidential palace in cairo. night has fallen there. we'll keep an eye on the situation. we have our steve harrigan there. we'll let you know as soon as we learn more. jenna: disturbing new signs al qaeda is on the rebound in parts of the middle east and after frica. the latest a large-scale al qaeda plot in jordan. they plan to hit deadly terror attacks in the capital and hit the u.s. embassy during the chaos. behind
iphone or android smartphone. one more way quicken loans is engineered to amaze. ♪ >>> the united nations the p palestinian authority was greated nonmember observer status. what's the only other entity with that status? stay tuned and we'll tell you the correct answer. go do cnn.com/fareed. you can follow us on twitter and facebook. go to itunes.com/fareed for our podcast. you can get a audio version for free or buy the book version. he inverted the idea what would make a system or country or individual anti-fragile. if you go to our conversation in the last segment you can tell this will is a fascinating book. for the last look. political sign professor likes to point out that in democratic nations highways are full of twilights and turns to accommodate people. in autocratic they are straight because leaders can bulldoze whatever is in the way to get to a straight line. take a look at this interesting twist. the builders of this highway in china built their road in a straight line but as you can see the road has a house right in the middle of it. the homeowner refused to budge so they bu
to the united nations under president clinton nancy and nile at the heritage foundation. all right, nancy, let's look at your reaction. dick cheney comes out and says we are not respected and not feared. chaos everywhere. and we're not really seeing leadership from washington. what's your reaction to that? >> he is just out of touch and should take a page out of president bush's book and stay on the sidelines, write his memoirs but he is really not looking at the world as it is today. president obama has made this world safer. he has restored america's respect around the world. and it's actually teed up to have an extraordinary second term to make progress to keep us safe on a range of issues. i'm sure that's what he will do. >> laura: if you are somebody who doesn't follow things closely but you look at the images on television and syria, clashes in egypt, islamism rising through the parts of africa. it doesn't look like especially religious minorities, cause of freedom is really being respected. it seems like chaotic is a very mild way of describing it. >> the world is chaotic. it was kay ou
successful palestinian bid for non-member observer state status at the united nations. david lee miller has the latest. >> israel says it is withholding the hundred million dollars because the palestinian authority owes israel state electrical company some $200 million. israel collected this money on behalf of the palestinian authority for taxes and customs duty. palestinian authority badly needs this cash to pay the more than 150,000 civil servants that is on its payroll. this is not the first time that the palestinian authority has had its money withheld. it happened two years ago. they held up the funds temporarily when they joined the unesco. hours ago mahmoud abbas got a hero's welcome. 35,000 people rallied and he said what happened in the u.n. was an historic achievement and it would strengthen united. they supported the vote but refuses israel's right to existed. now, the leadership is inviting the moderate party of the palestinian president to join their efforts in what they term the armed resistance. israel settlement construction on the west banks conned in response to the u.n. v
in the middle of this battle. john bolton joins me now, former u.s. ambassador to the united nations and a fox news contributor. this, as i said, ambassador bolton, feels like it is going to a new level. in terms of that red line that leon panetta talks about is it filling the canisters? is it moving them into place? where exactly does the red line happen do you think? >> i think it is unclear and part of the reason about the threats by the administration don't have credibility, previous red liens have already been crossed. moving the agent from its storage locations. i think in assad's situation he is very close to seeing the end of his regime. so if the choice for him is death at the hands of the opposition or using chemical weapons, threats by outsiders really are not going to sway him that much. martha: when you look back to the clinton administration and hillary clinton is very much involved in these discussions here. president clinton had said allowing genocide to happen in rwanda was one of his greatest failures in office. we know the president spent time with bill clinton recently. wha
to the united nations. president obama meets with two very different groups. both have concerns about the fiscal cliff conference. and remember he meets with them top ceo's. coming up the one issue where president obama is refusing to budge in those fiscal cliff negotiations. >>> right now 5:07. we want to check back in with tara who is in for sal. definitely wet roads out there. >> reporter: we do have an accident to report. this is a big rig verses a small pickup truck and an ambulance is on the way. we understand there are injuries involved. here it is right here. 880 northbound near the grand avenue exit. we had somebody needs an ambulance basically. we are keeping an eye on it. all right. up next we will take a live look at 280 in san jose. you can see traffic is actually flowing nicely in both directions. and it's 5:08 let's check in with steve. >> thank you tara. >>> our system is finally moving. this is the last one. it cannot hold a candle to the three that came in before. i will show you rain totals in a second. light rain, drizzle, fog, cloudy. once in awhile moderate rain falls. our
that appears on your screen. ♪ ♪ >> bret: secretary general of the united nations is the latest world leader to warn syria against using chemical weapons. there are indications tonight syria's embattled president may be working on an exit strategy. correspondent connor powell is watching from jerusalem. >> in the heart of damascus, syrian forces fire rockets on nearby rebel additions. the fighting moving closer to the assad regime headquarters. this comes as secretary of state hillary clinton today reiterated her warnings to syrian president bashar assad against using chemical weapons. once again, saying it would cross a red line. senior syrian official refused to confirm the existence of the weapons but denied the government is considering using them in the fight, despite intelligence reports to the contrary. >> our concerns are that increasingly desperate assad regime might turn to chemical weapons. or might lose criminal of them to one of the many groups that are now operating within syria. >> groups according to the u.s. intelligence reports that are affiliated with al-qaeda. and are inc
change conference from the united nations still going on. what do you expect to come out of it. >> unfortunately, virtually nothing. look, we've been having these conferences for 20 years where all the governments of the world get together and try to promise to cut carbon emissions, but the reason why we can't do that is because carbon is the side effect of stuff we like. it's the electricity we have in here, it's all the great things that fossil fuels provide. stuart: what should be the global fix to the co 2 emissions problem? what would you recommend? >> well, fundamentally, as long as green energy is much more expensive than fossil fuels you're never going to convince, certainly not china and india, but not even the u.s. and europeans, that you need to innovate the price down and that's the solutions pretty much every place. >> we haven't got the technology. >> and you expect that? >> absolutely, so the point is stop putting up inefficient solar panels now. but make sure you get them to be cheap enough everyone will want them in decades. >> your judge is that a carbon tax m
the palestinians closer to the goal. it may bring challenging to the united nations system and israel. >> shannon: secretary clinton adds the only way for lasting peace in region is for palestinian leaders to sit down with israel and come up with a two-state solution. the u.s. opposed the resolution on thursday. two big guests on fox news sunday. discussing the stalemate of the fiscal cliff between white house and republicans on capitol hill. i sat down with the anchor chris wallace to hear more about the exclusive interview interviews. >> you had two key players. >> we had tim geithner the point man for president. and john boehner, the point man for the congressional and house republicans. >> geithner made the offer to boehner on thursday. boehner said, tells us, he was flabbergasted and said you can't be serious. it called for doublebe what the president talked about in public. not $800 billion in new revenue but $1.6 trillion in revenue. only $600 million in entitlement and spending cuts. well, that is not one to one or three to one. more revenue than spending cuts. they are really far away no
. but the president is also considering to replace hillary clinton with john considerry. susan rice for the united nations, she is still facing opposition because of statements she made about the libyan attack. >>> president obama is meeting with two different groups today. both have concerns about the fiscal cliff crisis. he will lead with the ceos of business leaders and then later, he will meet with native- american tribal leaders. the one issue where he's refusing to budge in fiscal cliff issues. >>> the voters passed prop 30, which raises taxes on people who earn more than $250,000 a year. it also increases the sales tax. well, the ucla and der son forecast says because of prop 30 -- anderson forecast says because of prop 30, unemployment will not improve as fast and personal income will be less than expected. but economists say california is still on track for economic growth and more jobs. >>> well, sheriffs in solano county want your help. they are trying to catch vandals who damaged a home known for its holiday displays. every year, bob and linda taylor transform their home in vallejo on
. israel authorized the housing units after the united nations voted to upgrade palestinian status. palestine opposed the move. george hw bush in stable condition after receiving treatment for a bronchitissrelated cost. the 88-year-old has been in the hospital for a week receiving treatment visited by the children, including former president george w. bush. those are your headlines. back to lori and connell. >> thank you. >> sales numbers, general motors up 3% from last year, and others in the green as well thanks to, believe it or not, hurricane sandy. >> jeff flock has the story at the bureau in chicago. hi, jeff. >> indeed. two headlines. sandy one, and the other is fiscal cliff. starting to see the first impacts now in terms of considerations about fiscal cliff on the sales call today with ford keeping production up in the first quarter. they are bullish, increasing production by 11%, and gm holding off on sales forecasts because they are worried about the cliff. look at the numbers. as lori said, gm up 3%, ford up 6%, chrysler up, 30th consecutive month of increases for chrysl
.s. and russian senior diplomats will meet today with the united nations peace envoy for syria in an attempt to end the civil war there. this comes as pentagon sources tell nbc news there is intelligence suggesting the syrian government has loaded sarin gas into aerial bombs and awaiting command from president assad for its use. >>> and from our parade of papers, "the san francisco chronicle," american jazz legend dave brubeck died just short of his 92nd birthday. he redefined american jazz in the 1950s and '60s, and he was a jazz pop star of sorts. "take five" became the first jazz recording to sell over a million copies. it made jazz popular in the united states. dave brubeck dying yesterday. >> a great musician. >> little-known fact, the guy that played stand-up bass for him the last ten years, mike allen. >> is that right? >> nobody knew that. allen. yes, he plays it and spins that thing around. >> oh, i love when he does that, slaps the back of it. >> he also, for a year and a half, when the stray cats went over to london. >> mike ailen? >> stand-up bassist for the stray cats. >> the bo
in the united kingdom and there he is right there. he went to the united nations meeting on climate change in qatar. >> brian: his problem was his message. he doesn't think the climate is changing. he says i've been going here, we've been doing this for 16 years, nothing is happening. we're not listening to the other side. so everyone took notes and they learned from that and global warming is indeed wrong. they tossed him! they said hit the road! >> gretchen: it was supposed to be a debate, apparently, at this convention. but a debate usually involves two different points of view. i guess this time they're gog have one point of view. >> steve: apparently it wasn't his turn to talk and he grabbed a microphone and now he is banned for life. >> brian: he's not a lord. he's not from the house of lords. he's got an interesting title. >> steve: yeah. lord. >> brian: is he a lord? >> steve: apparently, according to the telegraph. >> brian: not the lord? he's a lord. >> steve: thank you. >> gretchen: ten lords a leaping. >> brian: not anymore. >> steve: i've never known this to happen to anybody,
of the acceptance in the united nations. the u.s. rejected the decision. a hurricane sandy victim surprised with a new genority. >> there is not a word in the dictionary to express my appreciation and openance at this moment. that is 95 year old pete who was living without heat or water and power. a contractor saw the story and rebuilt the house from top to bottomment >> he didn't know me from adam and look. see what he did. he's wonderful. >> the contractor said he plan to help more storm victims rebuild their lives. >> finally a happy ending. >> should illegals get a break on in state tuition on the backs of legal students. outrage from constitients forced one to fight back. >> steve: how can you make your relationship work? the answer is right under your nose? what does that mean? we'll explain straight ahead. >> our next gests said it is it not fair to taxpayers and wanting to resprerse that policy. massachusetts governor duval patrick. how important is it now. james lyons. representative, why does this bother you so much? >> it is it sending the wrong message. the governor is forcing t
excellence in research needed to help the united states to achieve national goals for health, energy, the environment, and security in the global community of the 21st century? the national research council is the working group of the national academy. they produce products that informed public opinion, shape policies, and advance the pursuit of engineering in madison. that question posed by congress is pretty complicated. the national research council leaders needed to put together a panel of leaders that represent a broad range of disciplines. they convened leaders from business and industry, from the academy, and from government. i had the privilege of being a member of the panel. congress asked for ten actions that can be taken to shore up universities. restructured our report around 10 recommendations. one of those recommendations focused on policies affecting the flow of international scholars and students to the united states. more and more international students are applying to come to our research universities. uva has had a 60% increase in such applications in the last thre
's called forces. if they want to do something, to speak out against austerity and cuts, the national nurses united and anew is holding demonstrations in 20 cities next monday, tomorrow and people can find out more and get active in favor of the transaction tax or the robin hood tax where they live. get involved in this fight now. >> dave? >> you should know that gay soldiers are still hurting, particularly in their relationships. i've been following two officers in hiding for 12 years now. it's really, really hard to have a boyfriend. when i see michelle obama and dr. biden doing this great work with military families, it's incredible the outreach they're doing and having the importance of the entire family unit. with gay people, even after don't ask don't tell, they're usually excluded from that. there are a thousand different other reasons that make it really hard. but when i did my piece, i am expanding now for a book, in 2000 we called it don't ask, don't tell, don't fall in love. that turned out to be the hard part. they can ask now and tell you about it's hard to fall in love. >> unre
immigrants have been viewed more or less favorably in the united states. this is a nation of immigrants but when immigration was largely cut off during the 1920's a lot of americans became estranged from the immigrant roots of their forebearers and lost the sense that we were a nation of immigrants. but in some parts of the country today you see the enormous vitality that comes with a really diverse and active population that attracts immigrants and the kind of zestfulness they add to a community like those in northern virginia or southern california or texas where i spent most of my adult life. so i'm not sure it's true that everybody has a negative attachment to immigration. but on the other hand, i think the political controversy about immigration much about undocumented immigrants has led people to a negative cast to immigration. i can tell you that the united states as well as europe and many other countries including eventually china because of our current demographic situation, we will turn to immigration increasingly because our ter tilt is approaching below replacement level so
point. on your second point, the opec nations in being friends of the united states, i think the answer to that is that both sides have had a relationship that has been economically necessary, but i do not think the opec cartel conducts its affairs in a way to benefit the united states of america. they conduct their affairs so that they do not kill the goose that laid the golden egg. if you turn into the record on pages 8 and 9, you're asking for some visual clues as to what's going on here. if you look on page 8 coming will see the united states is paying about $20 million per month to import petroleum. you see the sharp rise in the line just before 2008 and then it sort of flat lines from 2008 going through the significant dip that was represented by the subprime mortgage meltdown. what's interesting about it is from that point forward it has remained about 50% of the balance of payments and deficits. that is because the oil cartel prices the marginal barrel of oil as what it costs to get it out of the ground and what the maximum is that they cannot pay without tipping the consumers o
farm that you're looking at right there to the united states to help boost our nation's seafood supply and economy has been derailed by u.s. federal regulations and now he's being forced to ship his operation somewhere else. we'll tell you where in a moment. why are we driving businesses overseas the way we've done with the oil industry? joining us is the fellow at the competitive enterprise institute, nonpartisan group that studies the economic impact of federal regulations. this guy by the name of brian came up with open blue. what it is, it's a fish farm that he's figured a way to take the nets out into the middle of the ocean and do what? >> what he's able to do is to fish farm not guilty a way that satisfies three important groups. one is the foodies. people who understand the taste of wild fish prefer to have fish raised in open ocean. second is the environmentalist. coastal fish farms are associated with a number of environmental problems, putting it out in deep water washing away all the waste, the fish never swim in the same water twice. he made it economically viable. that me
brokered by the u.s. there has been an effort to enlarge and unite the coalition of free syrian forces, national coalition -- britain has recognized a group. france has recognized a group. it looks like next week the u.s. will recognize it. this will allow us to send more aid primarily humanitarian but also likely given where we are increased military aid to them which is now going through third parties like qatr. the bad news is these groups run the spectrum. they include al-qaeda-like forces. so two of the military bases that have fallen in recent weeks, two rebel forces have fallen to al-qaeda-like militias who have taken over. so unfortunately, what you're likely to see is after assad falls, then the real chaos begins. then you'll see fighting between the militia groups, some of which are definitely opposed to the united states and everything we stand for. >> bill: there is enough of a core, you believe? >> so that's the game right now. can you beef up those? can you increase those. so you actually -- i'm not m
and foremost this is one of the most important dates that the united states of america experienced during the 20th century. this was one of the important moments of our nation's overall history because this was the moment that brought us as a combat ant power into the second world war. they're a bit of a challenge to expose younger people to the subject and to tell them why it was important. for me it was extremely easy, i was raised around a veteran the pearl harbor, an uncle of mine. he has since died. as the generation recedes from living memory and it's important to make this subject accessible to young people in an age when they're bombarded by imagery. it's fascinating for me to consider how 71 years ago you didn't have a situation where people walk around with video cameras in their pockets like today. you don't see coverage like you saw of september 11th. so with just a few sources of information, with a few sources of moving imagery, we were able to piece together what i consider to be the finest pearl harbor documentary to date. >> there's so much more i wish we could talk about
simes, president of the center for the national interest, a foreign policy think tank. and steven heydemann, a senior adviser for middle east initiatives at the united states institute of peace. he's worked with the syrian opposition on the challenges ahead once the assad regime falls. steve, to you first. what do you understand the situation on the ground to be right now in syria? >> we have seen in the past month a significant shift in the momentum of events on the ground. we have seen the opposition increase the effectiveness of its tactics. it has acquired weapons that have permitted it to challenge the regime much more effectively across a broad range of fronts ranging from the south of syria to damascus to the north, and we're seeing this reflected in the regime's response to the opposition including some of the activities surrounding movement of chemical weapons. we don't know exactly what's at stake but part of the speculation is that they're putting themselves into a position in which they could create a defensive zone if it turns out to they're unable to defend damascus
: friday, december 7th here, the "full-court press" coming to you life from our nation's capitol and our studio on capitol hill brought to you today by the united steel workers and their great international president, leo gerard, north america's largest industrial union rep precepting 1.2 million active and retired members usw.org. big news this week uteout in the west, to colorado and washington. they had approved on november 6th each day, approving a measure for the full legalization of recreational use of marijuana. those laws have now kicked in. it is legal in washington and colorado to smoke pot. but will the if he did allow it? al ant saint pierre is the executive director of norml gets a lot of credit. allen, good to see you. >> good day, bill >> bill: i want you to know that last week, last time you were here, the question was raised about what the obamastration was going to do about this. i promised you i would try to get an answer from the white house. >> you did. >> i did. i tried. here is what that sounded like last week, me and jay carney.
then said the united states faces a number of challenges, including large budget deficits, national debt, slower economic recovery from the recession, high unemployment, and a deep political divide on many issues. do you believe we will overcome these challenges in the foreseeable future as we have done in the past do you think these are you a unique set of challenges that we might not be able to overcome this challenges? 2/3 of voters say we will be able to do that, 31% have concerns about that. if you look at the bars, the one the spike up, younger voters confident we'll get there, african-american voters, 85%, hispanics, 66%, and in those are the fundamentals of democratic party, 85% of democrats saying it will improve. which of the following a purchase the government do you think the president to take put it this is the short term, long term, a visionary approach focusing on long-term goals or a practical approach to addressing near-term challenges? 55%, you see people wanting a longer term visionary approach. if you look across the bottom at the different groups, this is most popula
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? >> absolutely. polls show that republicans would overwhelmingly be blamed if the united states goes over the proverbial fiscal cliff. and that's why president obama has an advantage, because he's willing -- he says, this is what he and his advisers say, he's willing to send the nation off of the fiscal cliff, letting all income tax rates to jump, spending cuts to take hold, investment income rates to jump. he's willing to do that. he thinks republicans would get the political blame. republicans, on the other hand, note that listen, the president's going to have to have another term where he's dealing with what's likely to be a deep recession as a result of these huge income tax jumps. so it's a position that neither man really wants to be in, but talks have completely dried up. yesterday speaker john boehner and president obama did not speak and their staffs did not speak. so really this thing is at a standstill like we've never seen before. >> yeah. so the fact that we're not even talking now. the aides aren't even talking the each other. where does that leave us? how comfortable is eve
Search Results 0 to 38 of about 39 (some duplicates have been removed)